Trinidad and Tobago


Religious Demography

The country has a total area of 1,980 square miles, and its population is approximately 1.3 million.

There is no dominant faith among the multiethnic population, which is 40 percent African and 40 percent East Indian; the remainder are of European, Syrian, Lebanese, and Chinese descent. According to the latest official statistics (1990), about 29 percent of the population are practicing or nominally Roman Catholic; 24 percent are Hindu; 6 percent are Muslim; and 31 percent are Protestant (including 11 percent Anglican,

7 percent Pentecostal, 4 percent Seventh-Day Adventist, 3 percent Presbyterian/Congregational, and 3 percent Baptist). A small number of individuals follow Obeah and other traditional Caribbean religions with African roots; sometimes these are practiced together with other faiths.

Foreign missionaries present include members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons), Baptists, Mennonites, and Muslims. The Mormons maintain the maximum total allowed (30) of foreign missionaries per religious denomination in the country, while other denominations maintain between 5 and 10 foreign missionaries.

{Extracted from International Religious Freedom Report
http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/irf/2001/5741.ht

Muslims in Trinidad and Tobago constitute only 8 percent of the population and are mostly of East Indian descent, but they play an important political, economic, and social role: numerous elected officials are Muslim, and many businesses are Muslim-owned. In 1990 Trinidad was briefly thrust into the world spotlight when an obscure Black Muslim group attempted to overthrow the democratically elected government by force. There are about eighty-five mosques on Trinidad but only one or two on Tobago. The government officially recognizes several Muslim holidays and sponsors an annual Id al-Fitr celebration. Islamic leaders have begun to join with Christians and Hindus in calling attention to growing problems with alcoholism, drug abuse, violent crime, and AIDS.


    (Page 3 of 3)   « Prev  1  2  
    3
      
    Next »

    I spent five months in Trinidad and Tobago beginning in January 2006 interviewing Muslim Trinidadians on this issue. Trinidad and Tobago, a country in the southern Caribbean, has a truly multicultural, vibrant society where religious and cultural tolerance and assimilation are an intrinsic part of the community. Muslims represent around 6% of Trinidad's population, but together they stand as a powerful force in the diverse population on the island.

    Dr. Nasser Mustapha explained that the lasting presence of the religion began with the East Indians.

    (Page 3 of 3)   « Prev  1  2  
    3
      
    Next »
    No popular authors found.
    No popular articles found.